Training Schedule

I have got a few questions regarding the training schedule that we are using to attempt to train for this Marathon that is in exactly 82 days. (Yes I do have a countdown widget on my phone) I thought I would post it on here for whomever! I took it from Runners World and adapted it to fit our time schedule and dates. Let me know if you have any questions! (as if I’m an expert!)

Week

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Total

May 2-8 Rest 4 miles, including 4:00 TUT Rest 1-hour run Rest 4 miles 6 miles 15-16 miles
May 9-15 Rest 4 miles, including 4:00 TUT Rest 1-hour run Rest 4 miles 7 miles 15-16 miles
May 16-22 Rest 4 miles, including 5:00 TUT Rest 6 miles Rest Rest 8 miles 18-19 miles
May 23-29 Rest 4 miles, including 5:00 TUT Rest 6 miles Rest Rest 9 miles 18-19 miles
May 30-5 Rest 4 miles, including 3×2:00 AI Rest 4 miles Rest June 4th 5k 6-8 miles 19-21 miles
June 6-12 Rest 5 miles, including 6:00 TUT Rest 7 miles Rest Rest 10 miles 22-24 miles
June 13-19 Rest 5 miles, including 7:00UTUT Rest 8 miles Rest Rest 14miles 25-27 miles
June 20- 26 Rest 5 miles, including 3×3:00 AI Rest 4 miles Rest June 25th 10K 5 miles 24 miles
June 27-3 Rest 5 miles, including 8:00 TUT Rest 9 miles Rest Rest 16 miles 30-32 miles
July 4-10 Rest 5 miles, including 8:00 TUT Rest 9 miles Rest Rest 18 miles 30-32 miles
July 11-17 Rest 5 miles, including 9:00 TUT Rest 10 miles Rest 4 miles 20 miles 39 miles
July 18-24 Rest 5 miles, including 9:00 TUT Rest 10 miles Rest 4 miles 10 miles 29 miles
July 25- 31 Rest 3 miles, including 3X3:00 AI Rest 5 miles Rest 3 miles, including 3×2:00 AI 5 miles 16 miles
August 1- 7 Rest 3 miles, Including 3×2:00 AI Rest 3-mile jog Rest 2-mile jog August 7th ¬†– Bend¬† Haulin Aspen MARATHON Week TOTAL: 34.2 miles

Definitions (Taken straight from Runners World)

Aerobic Intervals (AI): Timed repetitions (of 2:00 to 3:00 minutes) slightly faster than your normal training pace–enough to make you breathe harder, but still not go anaerobic (panting, gasping, verge-of-out-of-breath). Jog slowly after each repetition until you are refreshed enough to run the next.

Total Uphill Time (TUT): The total number of minutes you spend running semivigorously up inclines–could be repeats up the same hill or total uphill time over a hilly loop.

Easy Runs: mean totally comfortable and controlled. If you’re running with someone else, you should be able to converse easily. You’ll likely feel as if you could go faster. Don’t. Here’s some incentive to take it easy: You’ll still burn about 100 calories for every mile that you run.

Long Runs: are any steady run at or longer than race distance designed to enhance endurance, which enables you to run longer and longer and feel strong doing it. A great long-run tip: Find a weekly training partner for this one. You’ll have time to talk about anything that comes up.

Speedwork: means bursts of running shorter than race distance, some at your race goal pace, some faster. This improves cardiac strength, biomechanical efficiency, running economy, and the psychological toughness that racing demands.

Race Day Rules: Run slower than you feel like you should be running over the first 12-13 miles. Look around, chat a bit with those around you. And walk through the aid stations, drink fluids, take a little break, then slowly resume your running.

Happy Running!!